Agreement Establishing The Council Of Legal Education

An LEC allows its holder to be approved in any country or territory that is a signature of the agreement. As a general rule, no person holding an LEC can be admitted in this way. The original agreement released persons qualified to practise law on 1 October 1971 or before 1 October 1971 or who had completed studies leading to a qualification which would have enabled them to practise as lawyers before that date and who had completed that course before 1 January 1980. [2] An addendum of September 1984 extended the transition period and also provided for separate directors for each of the faculties of public law empowered to issue LECs. [5] The Council has existed for over 40 years and trains legal practitioners in the Commonwealth Caribbean in accordance with its vision of 17 March 1971 for the entry into force of an agreement between the Contracting Parties. Became an associated institution of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) after the signing of T-XT7373 – Treaty of Chaguaramas, 4 Jul.1973. Also called caribbean Council of Legal Education. Initially, Belize did not accede to the 1984 supplement, but then signed it. It was a signatory to the 1970 agreement under the name “British Honduras”. [5] In the Caribbean, to assume and exercise overall responsibility for the practical professional training of persons wishing to become members of the legal profession; the establishment, equipping and maintenance of law schools; make appropriate arrangements with regard to curricula and practical instructions for the awarding of prizes, the holding of examinations and the issuance of the Legal Education Certificate; evaluate curricula at other institutions and appropriately recognize legal qualifications. There are three law schools authorized to award LECs: Norman Manley Law School in Jamaica, Hugh Wooding Law School in Trinidad and Tobago, and Eugene Dupuch Law School in the Bahamas. As a rule of thumb. B graduates from The University of the West Indies are entitled to automatic admission to the aforementioned law schools, while others must pass an entrance exam.

[3] Another agreement allows graduates of the University of Guyana to also bypass the entrance exam. This derogation applies only to Guyanese nationals. In 2010, Belize`s Attorney General, Oscar Ramjeet, advocated for the exception to be extended to Belizeans. [4] Individuals who have received legal training elsewhere cannot be admitted to our region unless they receive the Legal Education Certificate. However, any person professionally qualified in a common law (English) can be admitted to one of the law schools and a Legal Education Certificate can be awarded at the end of a six-month course. “Facilitate the development of competent justice practitioners for the region, who recognize their responsibility as members of an honourable profession and recognize the needs of their socio-economic environment and are inspired by the pursuit of excellence, the maintenance of high ethical standards, the promotion of social justice and the strengthening of the rule of law.” The appeal, against which it is alleged that the law schools` admission procedure discriminates against degree holders outside the University of the West Indies (UWI), was rejected this afternoon in a ruling by the Caribbean Court of Justice (CCJ). Council, composed of: Dean of the Faculty of Law of the University of the West Indies and another faculty member appointed by him; The principals of the three law schools; Head of Justice of each participating territory; Attorney General of any participating territory; 2 professionals appointed by the competent authority of each of the four participating zones (Jamaica, Barbados, Trinidad and Tobago, Guyana); one member of the profession designated by the competent professional organisation of each of the other participating areas. . . .